South Carolina’s Pension Push Into High-Octane Investments

South Carolina’s Pension Push Into High-Octane Investments

South Carolina’s Pension Push Into High-Octane Investments

New York Times

Curtis M. Loftis Jr., South Carolina’s treasurer, says he worries that state pension officials have had their heads turned by Wall Street players who stand to benefit from state money. “This is a world where people have private jets, massive apartments overlooking Central Park, people who live exotic lives,” he says.

MANY mornings, the yellow Lamborghini would swing into view, sweep past tree-softened streets with a low, smooth rumble and throttle down outside an office near the State House downtown.

Behind the wheel was a financier named Robert L. Borden. Around Columbia, a city decidedly more Ford than Lamborghini, his exotic supercar gave him the air of a Wall Street hotshot. In truth, Mr. Borden was a civil servant — a very highly paid one. Until recently, he was the investment chief of South Carolina’s giant public pension system.

It turns out that Mr. Borden liked his investments the way he liked his cars. Which is to say, fast. With the help of some big names on Wall Street and a nod from officials here, he transformed this state’s go-slow public pension system into one of the most high-octane in the nation. So far, though, the results have been mixed. The long-term consequences — for retirees, public workers and taxpayers here — are as yet unknown.

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One Comment

  1. Curtis Loftis is what an elected official should be…true to his word, hard working and fearless. I am proud I voted for him.

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